frequently asked questions

gestational carriers

Q:

What is a surrogate?

A:There are two types of surrogates: gestational carriers (most common)and traditional surrogates (less common). A New Beginning Surrogacy works with gestational carriers also known as gestational surrogates.

A gestational carrier or a gestational surrogate has no biological link to the baby. A gestational carrier is a woman who has a completed embryo transferred through IVF (In vitro-fertilization) and carries a baby and delivers the baby for the intended parents to raise as their own. The embryo is created from a donor egg and donor sperm.

A traditional surrogate is the baby’s biological mother. The surrogates egg is used and then artificially inseminated with donor sperm. The traditional surrogate carries the baby and delivers the baby for the intended parents to raise as their own.

Most surrogacy agencies only work with gestational carriers.

Q:

How old should I be to become a surrogate or gestational carrier? 

A: Surrogates should be between 21 – 41 years of age.

Q:

Can I be a gestational carrier if I’ve never had a child?

A: A New Beginning’s Surrogacy program requires gestational carriers to have had at least one healthy delivery.  It’s essential that a gestational carrier has prior pregnancy experience and a proven healthy and successful birth or births.

Q:

If my tubes are tied, can I still be a gestational carrier?

A: Yes.  If your tubes are tied you can still be a gestational carrier because the embryo is placed directly into your uterus by in vitro fertilization.

Q:

Are there age limits to becoming a gestational carrier?

A: Yes.  A gestational carrier should be between 21-41 years of age.  We follow recommendations from the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

Q:

Will extensive travel be required?

A: Not necessarily.  The gestational carrier can identify a fertility clinic of choice and also be open to discussing options with the matched intended parents.  In some cases, travel can speed up the process simply due to available appointments.  Of course, local travel to medical appointments will be necessary.

Q:

What are the basic requirements to become a surrogate/gestational carrier?

A: Your health and safety is very important and we follow guidelines set forth by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.  To view the list of basic surrogate requirements, look here.

Q:

Will I be compensated as a gestational carrier?

A: Yes.  A first time gestational carrier will earn a base compensation of $35,000.  A proven gestational carrier earns a higher base compensation for each subsequent surrogate pregnancy. In addition to a base surrogate compensation, other allowances and/or compensation may be provided based on specific pregnancy situations.   All embryo transfer and pregnancy related costs will be covered by the intended parents.  For details, please refer to the gestational surrogate compensation page.

Q:

Will I meet the intended parents?

A: Yes.  Gestational carriers and intended parents go through a meeting process prior to the match.  The meeting may be virtual, by phone or in-person.  Once a match is made, in-person meetings will occur.

Q:

What kind of relationship will I have with the intended parents?

A: Every surrogacy situation and relationship is different.  Once a match is made, A New Beginning’s Surrogacy Coordinator will help both parties build a positive and comfortable relationship and navigate any issues that might be uncomfortable or simply help with the details.

Q:

Does my significant other have to be involved in the surrogacy journey?

A: Yes.  It is very important each gestational carrier’s significant other is a positive support through the experience.   Partners, spouses and/or significant others will be included in the contracts and be required to  have medical screenings for communicable diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C, CMV, other sexually transmitted diseases or disorders.

Q:

Do the intended parents pay for the costs associated with the pregnancy?

A: Yes.  The Intended Parents pay for the pregnancy costs associated with the surrogacy pregnancy.  Please refer to the compensation page.

Q:

Does my medical insurance cover surrogacy costs? 

A: Not likely.  When a gestational carrier begins her surrogacy journey, she should identify IF her current medical coverage is surro-friendly.  If it is not, the intended parents will be required to provide a private policy to cover the medical costs.  The intended parents will pay the premium, co-pays and all balances related to the surrogacy.

Q:

As a gestational carrier, do I use my own egg for the pregnancy?

A: No.  A gestational carrier or a gestational surrogate doesn’t use her own biological material for the pregnancy.  A complete embryo is transferred to her using the in vitro fertilization process.  The embryo was created using donor egg and donor sperm.

Q:

I love my OB/GYN.  Can I use my own OB/GYN during my surrogacy journey?

A: Yes.  Surrogacy is quite common now and most OB/GYN’s are very comfortable continuing care with surrogacy situations.  After the embryo transfer process is successful your care can be transferred to your selected (and experienced) OB/GYN.

Q:

Will I have help in navigating the surrogacy journey? 

A: Yes.  A New Beginning Surrogacy has over 16 years experience helping pregnant women navigate their pregnancies and relationships with parents.  Each gestational carrier will have an appointed surrogacy coordinator who will help you each step of the way.

Q:

I am currently utilizing government assistance. Can I become a gestational carrier?

A: No.  Gestational carriers must not currently be receiving government assistance to enter the program.